We Are Here: Advocacy Tips for Youth

We Are Here & We Will Be Seen  

Image description: someone holding up a sign reading 'a better world is possible' in a crowd of people 


This month's reader submission comes from Grant E. Loveless, who is an AfroQueer non-binary Youth Advocate and Social Entrepreneur in the City of Austin (Austin, Texas). 

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5 Tips for Youth On The Front Lines of Advocacy, Change & Justice:

In America we are young, tired and traumatized. We are tired of validating our space, our  existence and the reason why we should have a seat at the table. Youth are continuously ignored, being  dismissed, and unheard. Stereotyping youth as “too young” or “not experienced enough” has been a  consistent strategy to devalue the movements that we create.  Youth are dying. Bullets piercing our skin, the hands of our “​protectors​” bruise us, while the  weight of our own communities burden us with expectations that we, as a future generation, are  expected to embrace.   Not only do we confront our internalized trauma while witnessing the oppressive realities of  our world, we also resist the tendency to reduce youth experiences into pure statistics, devoid of  socio-political meaning. We know that if we die at the hands of police, justice will not be served within  the “​justice​” system and will be left as a number to the added list of Black and brown bodies whose  blood is stained in our streets at the root of America’s issue: racism. We should not have to experience  the moments that are supposed to be the cornerstone of our lives in fear and uncertainty.  However, we conjurged our power to disrupt the day-to-day uncertainties, disadvantages and  injustices. We as youth have blossomed into an impalpable force to where youth advocates like Nahjah  and Nashon Wilson in Stafford, VA; the four women who built the Teens4Equality organization in  Nashville, TN; Mical Juliet, Franki Phoenix, Zauvier Fenceroy and myself in Austin, Texas continue  to push for public and social policy reform, collaborative change and economic justice. With our  efforts being recognized it is imperative that we continue to prepare youth for what is to come.  As U.S  Senator  Cory Booker said, “​You don’t have to be one of those people that accepts things as they are.  Every day, take responsibility for changing them right where you are.”  Below are five tips for youth I have created from my experience as a Youth Advocate and  Student Leader in the City of Austin to begin their journey into advocacy, community activism and  social entrepreneurship.    
1.) Understand You Are Your #1 Priority   
If you do not take care of yourself how can you serve others at the best capacity you  can. Self care is about self-reflection and it's a journey. Learning and establishing a self care  routine does not happen overnight, it takes time. You may be thinking, what does self care  mean? Well, self care is ambiguous. Self care means knowing who you are and understanding  your limits; developing a good sleeping pattern and eating habits; constructing ways to  decompress and realign your mind, spirit and energy; taking time to know yourself, your goals  and how you want to manifest the change-maker you want to be; identifying what you love  and hate or what motivates and discourages you. Self care can be simply defined as self love,  but on that journey to that you first must identify your “why” and thrive.       
2.) Find Your “Why” and Your Vision!  
To find your “why” and your vision you must: (1) Identify your core values, (2)  Discover who inspires you, who motivates you to be the catalyst of change in your community  and (3) Understand that your vision takes time to develop and grow. It will change, shift and  possibly renew itself over time.   With developing your “why” and vision you cannot put your hands in multiple pots,  overwhelming and stressing yourself. Take your time and volunteer with local organizations,  reach out to community members whose interests align with yours and ask questions or do a  journey of self-discovery and read books, articles or blogs to gain knowledge on your interests  and whichever topic you feel touches your soul start pursuing it. However, with this journey  you must understand not everyone will agree with your stance nor stand with you when you  need support.    3.) Be Aware of Who Is For You and Against You  
In the world of advocacy and on your way to achieving justice and change you will  have your allies and opposers. Not everyone will agree with your values, ideas or your right to  have a seat at the table. You must be prepared for that realization and “no” to your cause.   However, this should never discourage you. Utilize your colleagues, close peers, past  and current employers, teachers or anyone who is interested in investing in you and form a  community. Once you have a community backing you up, you will be unstoppable. If you are  not given a seat at the table build your own table and create the change you want to see. Your  existence does not need validation, you are a force and a resistance.    
4.) Time Management  
Do not overwhelm, stress or burden yourself trying to take advantage of every  opportunity and the issues damaging your communities. Establish a foundation for your  brand and the issues you want to solve in your community as well as using your local  community members and organizations to further your goals. When you use time managing  tools like Trello, Asana, Google Calendar or even the Reminders app on your phone you can  then begin implementing strategies to your success on how much time you are allocating for  the issues you want to solve and the commitments you are going to take on.    
5.) You Are ​ NEVER​ Alone  
You are never alone. Whatever country, state, city or town you reside in there are  organizations and individuals who will support, uplift and cherish the work you do.  Remember it doesn’t matter what platform you use, it's about the work you produce and the  presence you create when you walk into a room. You will never be alone, we are here always.   ---  In conclusion, use the tips in this article and my words of encouragement to be the  change. I urge you to utilize these tips and start generating the momentum you want to see  your community taking in approaching and addressing structures of ageism, racism,  xenophobia or any sign of inequity. Start now. Engage with your communities. Mobilize and create change.